May 17, 2019

How do you treat a fractured heel bone (calcaneus fracture)?

Foot and Ankle

THIS POST IS PART OF THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO FOOT AND ANKLE INJURIES

A heel bone fracture, also referred to as a calcaneus fracture, occurs when the heel is crushed under the weight of the body after a fall from a ladder or a car crash.

Anatomy

The feet contain nearly one-fourth of all the bones in your body, which provide you with support and movement. There are 26 bones in one foot: 14 toe bones, five long metatarsal bones and seven tarsal bones. The heel bone (calcaneus) is the largest of the tarsal bones in the foot.

Although fractures of the heel bone are uncommon, it can be extremely painful and may cause the heel bone to widen or shorten. Additionally, a heel bone fracture can often lead to chronic pain and permanent disability.

What causes a calcaneus fracture?

  • Fall from a height
  • Twisting injury to the ankle
  • Car collision

What are the symptoms of a heel fracture?

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising of the foot
  • Heel deformity
  • Inability to walk or put weight on the heel

The severity of symptoms can vary based on:

  • The number of fractures in and around the heel bone
  • The amount and size of the broken bone fragments
  • The injury to the cartilage surface surrounding the heel bone
  • The injury to the surrounding soft tissues, such as muscles, tendons and skin
  • The amount each broken fragments are out of place

Physician examination

To determine whether you have a broken heel, your physician will ask you for a complete medical history, have you describe your symptoms and how the injury occurred and conduct a physical examination. An X-ray or CT scan may be necessary to rule out other problems.

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT WITH A FOOT AND ANKLE SPECIALIST AT ORTHOINDY

Treatment for a calcaneus fracture

Treatment depends on the cause and severity of your injury. Treatment focuses on restoring normal heel function and correcting any deformity.

Nonsurgical treatment is possible if the pieces of the broken heel have not been displaced. Treatment involves immobilization with a cast, splint or brace for six to eight weeks.

However, most often a broken heel requires surgery. Surgery type depends on the severity of the fracture. The more severe the injury, the more complex the surgery and recovery period.

How long does it take for a calcaneus fracture to heal?

It could take six to ten weeks before you can begin weight-bearing after initial injury or surgery. Recovery focuses on early motion, physical therapy and weight-bearing exercises.
At-home treatment for foot and ankle injuries

Schedule an appointment

Your well-being is important to us. Click the button below or call us to schedule an appointment with one of our orthopedic specialists. If your injury or condition is recent, you can walk right into one of our OrthoIndy Urgent Care locations for immediate care. For rehabilitation and physical therapy, no referral is needed to see one of our physical therapists.

Schedule an Appointment Call OrthoIndy 317.802.2000
Megan Golden

By Megan Golden

Megan is the current Marketing Team Lead at OrthoIndy. Megan graduated from Ball State University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in public relations and advertising and communications studies minor and has been with OrthoIndy since June 2012.

Related Posts

More from OrthoIndy

Patient undergoes foot and ankle surgery

Patient undergoes foot and ankle surgery

A complete foot and ankle reconstruction allows cancer survivor to continue working with animals.

More

Busy mom brings son to urgent care for broken ankle treatment

Busy mom brings son to urgent care for broken ankle treatment

After being unsure if her son had a sprained or broken ankle, a busy mom decides to turn to OrthoIndy Urgent Care for help.

More

What is tarsal coalition of the foot?

What is tarsal coalition of the foot?

Is tarsal coalition rare and is tarsal coalition genetic? Learn more about tarsal coalition and its symptoms, treatment and recovery.

More

Get stories and News in your inbox

Subscribe to our weekly articles