August 28, 2019

Young gymnast undergoes tibia fracture surgery for two broken legs

Foot and Ankle | Patient Stories | Pediatric Orthopedics | Sports Injury

THIS POST IS PART OF THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO FOOT AND ANKLE INJURIES

Gracie Sproles, a young gymnast, was training more than 25 hours a week and putting her body through a lot of stress. It got to the point where every time she trained, she was in an extreme amount of pain, but she continued to push through it.

However, after gymnastics practice in September 2016, Gracie began noticing bruising and swelling in both of her shins. She was under the impression that she had shin splints. Unfortunately, this was the start of a career-ending injury and the beginning of a new journey.

More than a year later, in December 2017, Gracie competed in her last gymnastics competition. She landed on her elbow and cracked her growth plate during her floor routine. She visited the doctor for her elbow and after an examination, the doctor discovered she had fractures in both of her shins as well.

About a month later, Gracie saw an orthopedic specialist that told her she could continue practicing gymnastics, even with her injuries. However, in March 2018, she visited the doctor again and was then told to wear a boot because she couldn’t even walk on her left leg.

Not only was Gracie upset she could no longer compete in gymnastics, but she was also afraid she wasn’t going to ever be able to walk again.

After a lot of confusion about her diagnosis, one of her fellow teammates from Rising Star Gymnastics suggested that she visit OrthoIndy. In March 2018, Gracie came to OrthoIndy and saw pediatric orthopedic physician, Dr. Carlos Berrios, who gave her the answers she needed.

Diagnosis and beginning stages

Dr. Berrios took X-rays of Gracie’s shins and determined she had two bilateral stress fractures in both tibias.

First, Gracie was put into casts on each of her legs from the knee down for eight weeks. Every two weeks Gracie would come to OrthoIndy to get her casts changed and take new X-rays to see if she was making any improvements.

“We decided to try casting first, but due to persistent pain and lack of healing over the eight weeks, surgery was necessary,” said Dr. Berrios.

Although Gracie knew that gymnastics was no longer going to be in her future, she was grateful Dr. Berrios was giving her a chance to walk again on her own.

Gracie remained hopeful through the whole process. “OrthoIndy employees Brad and Bill always had a positive attitude and always made me laugh,” said Gracie. “Many times I just wanted to break down and cry, but Dr. Berrios, Brad, Bill and the rest of the medical team always lifted my spirits. I knew that I was in good hands.”

The Ultimate Guide to Foot and Ankle Injuries

Tibia fracture surgery and recovery

Dr. Berrios offered two surgery options to treat Gracie’s injury. “Gracie had fractures of anterior cortex,” said Dr. Berrios. “The first option was to do intramedullary rodding, which helps stabilize the fracture or fixation with plates. However, I decided to go with the second option to use fixation with plates since we needed to achieve compression of the area to promote healing.”

After the surgery, Gracie started showing improvement. On August 1, 2018, Gracie was able to walk for the first time without any assistance.

“My OrthoIndy experience has been out of this world,” said Gracie. “Dr. Berrios is the best physician that I could have ever asked for. Without Dr. Berrios and his medical team, I wouldn’t have my life back.”

It has been a long and difficult journey for Gracie. “I still struggle daily with the insecurities of my scars, but I am more accepting towards them as each day goes on,” said Gracie. “I know that my scars don’t define me. I also know that my scars are beautiful because they gave me the ability to walk again.”

“If there was someone considering the same surgery that I had, I would highly recommend it,” said Gracie. “OrthoIndy gave me my life back and I am forever grateful.”

Even though Gracie’s injury has kept her from participating in gymnastics, it hasn’t taken her away from the sport completely. Gracie hopes to continue in the sport as a coach and help others achieve their dreams.

Gracie continues to update her story on her Instagram. Follow her @thegirlwithfireinherbones to stay updated on her journey.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Berrios please call 317.802.2847 or learn more about foot and ankle treatment at OrthoIndy.

Schedule an Appointment

Your well-being is important to us. Click the button below or call us to schedule an appointment with one of our orthopedic specialists. If your injury or condition is recent, you can walk right into one of our OrthoIndy Urgent Care locations for immediate care. For rehabilitation and physical therapy, no referral is needed to see one of our physical therapists

Schedule an Appointment Call OrthoIndy 317.802.2000
McKenzie Muchow

By McKenzie Muchow

McKenzie is the current Marketing Coordinator at OrthoIndy. McKenzie is responsible for online reputation management and creation of individual physician websites. McKenzie graduated from Butler University in 2017 with a bachelor’s degree in strategic communications with a concentration in journalism. She has been with OrthoIndy since January 2018.

Related Posts

More from OrthoIndy

Baseball pitcher finds relief from little leaguer’s elbow with physical therapy

Baseball pitcher finds relief from little leaguer’s elbow with physical therapy

How do you get rid of little league elbow? Learn how a baseball pitcher recovered.

More

Patient undergoes a torn rotator cuff surgery

Patient undergoes a torn rotator cuff surgery

What is the best treatment for rotator cuff injury? Do rotator cuff tears heal on their own? Learn how a patient recovered after a slip on the ice leads to a rotator cuff tear.

More

Young gymnast undergoes tibia fracture surgery for two broken legs

Young gymnast undergoes tibia fracture surgery for two broken legs

Does a broken tibia require surgery and how serious is a broken tibia? Learn more about recovery and walking after a tibia fracture.

More

Get stories and News in your inbox

Subscribe to our weekly articles